Uncategorized

1816-Coasters-BLog-2

Front Porch Cocktails

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Enjoy this spring twist on your favorite classic bourbon. Made for front porch sipping.

GINGERY BOURBON

CHARLIE PALMER GROUP | BEVERAGES

Ingredients
1 oz bourbon
1 T finely chopped ginger
6-8 oz good quality ginger ale
1 each orange slice
ice cubes

Method
Another great deck drink is this gingery bourbon, slightly peppery hot from the ginger and sweet from the bourbon at the same time.

You need to get a nice plump ginger root (not shriveled or dried out). Use a teaspoon to peel it (scraping around all the little bumps), and then fine chop (using the side of the blade to smash it the way you do with garlic cloves). Pre-chop enough for several rounds (or more guests) and store in a tiny Tupperware container, covering the chopped ginger with a wet piece of paper towel (to keep it damp) before putting on the lid.

Cram glass full of ice, add ingredients and stir well with skewer or chopstick.

The more drinks you have (using the same glass), the less ginger you need to add. Don’t discard the ice. The ginger clings to it.

Enjoy!

The Story of 1816

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Rising from nearly 200 years of hand-forged tradition, this is the 1816 story …

Rising from nearly 200 years of hand-forged tradition, the 1816 field-inspired apparel and accessory collection honors the rich history of Remington® heritage. Established in Ilion, New York in 1816, generations of sons, fathers and grandfathers worked side by side to hand-forge the stocks and barrels of this Great American icon. Now, 1816 bridges the timelessness of our visionary forefathers to the sporting gentleman of today.

1816-Blog-21714-KnitCare

How to Keep Your Knitwear in Top Form

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

The other week the Wall Street Journal gave us a good run down on how to care for our winter garments. Whether cotton or cashmere, all knits are unfortunately at risk of pilling. The article, written by Elizabeth Holmes, explains …

The unfortunate truth is that it’s very difficult when looking at a garment in a store to predict whether it will pill. Pilling is what’s known as a “latent defect,” a problem that appears only after the product is in use. “You don’t see it until you wear it,” Mr. Cormier says.

The material used in a particular garment may provide hints as to whether it will pill. Merino wool tends to be strong and when used in a tightly wound sweater would be less likely to pill than fuzzy, fine-gauge cashmere, says Gwen Whiting, co-founder of the Laundress, a New York fabric-care company. But nearly every garment, regardless of make or brand, is a candidate.

1816-Blog-21714-Creedmore

While it’s tough to fight, there are some things you can do to prevent pilling…

One option is to wear it sparingly—because the more a garment is worn, the more likely it is to pill, says Lorraine Muir, director of textile testing at the Drycleaning & Laundry Institute. The Woolmark Co. suggests letting clothing “rest” at least 24 hours before wearing again so the fibers recover from stretching during use.

Gale Senseny, sales manager of Sweater Stone Inc., makers of a pill-removing device in Issaquah, Wash., has a once-a-year trick to help prevent pilling on the sweaters that fill her wardrobe. She conditions them with lanolin, an oil that comes from sheep and is removed in the fiber-cleansing process. Ms. Senseny breaks down a small bit of lanolin in a dish of hot water and then fills a sink with tepid water. She pours the lanolin in, followed by a just-washed sweater. She rinses the garment and lays it out on a towel to dry.

The process helps smooth the scales on the yarn’s fiber, making them less rough and less likely to tangle with one another to form a pill. “It’s just like putting conditioner in your hair,” Ms. Senseny says.

Read on here so you can keep looking sharp and smart in your 1816 fine apparel.

 

1816-Blog-BirkshireMtn-3

1816 Artisan Spotlight: Berkshire Mountain Distillers

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

Last month we had a great time celebrating the launch of the 1816 Heritage Collection in true sporting fashion with a day of clay shooting and uplanding birding adventures at a beautiful plantation in Florida. 1816-Blog-BMD-Walker-Wool-JacketWhile there we encountered the unexpected fine tastemaking from our friends at Berkshire Mountain Distillers that we want to spotlight here.

These New England artisans are doing something right. In the Berkshire Mountains not far from our birthplace of Ilion, New York, the makers of BMD are channeling something inspired and of the earth to create very fine, unique batch spirits. After a full day out  in the field we returned to the lodge to enjoy a tasting of their Berkshire Bourbon and their limited release Sam Adams cask-finished bourbon whiskey - part of a special project they’ve initiated with select brewers around the country. The sipping was smooth, the field stories were flowing, and we toasted to quality craftsmanship, fine goods and great friends.

Note: Goes down easy with the Walker Wool Coat on a crisp fall evening.

1816-Blog-Sunrise-at-Bienville

Sunrise, Bienville Plantation, FL.

Fall Campfire Cooking

Fall Cooking in the Field: Grilling Venison

Posted by | Uncategorized | No Comments

One of our favorite things about fall  - besides the cool crisp air, the days spent outside in the field, and rooting for our hometown football teams – is the food. It doesn’t get much better than gathering your friends and family outside around the fire, grilling fresh cuts and whiling away the evenings in good company. So go on now, grab your whiskey, start the fire and try out this staple recipe from Charlie Palmer, one of the best.

GRILLED VENISON CHOPS WITH GLAZE
1816-blog-camp-cooking-chops
The loin section, or “backstrap,” of the deer is the most tender and so the most prized part of the animal.

Ingredients (Serves 4):

  • 4 trimmed venison rib/loin chops (about 6 oz each)
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Glaze:

  • 1/4 cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons garlic salt

Method:

1. Rub the chops on both sides with a touch of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, mix together the ingredients for the glaze and set aside.

2. Place the chops on a cleaned and lightly oiled grill over low heat and cook for 1 minute. Flip the chops and begin brushing the surface with the glaze. Flip and glaze 3 to 4 times every 2 minutes for rare to medium-rare doneness, which will register at just around 120°F on an instant-read thermometer.

3. Transfer the chops to plates and let rest 5 minutes. Plating ideas: Place corn relish on top of each chop and serve with roasted new potatoes, a simple salad, or Memphis-Style Coleslaw.

Palmer Notes: Substitute elk chops, the cooking time will vary because of size. This recipe with lamb chops is a summer staple.

(function() { var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true; ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s); })();